Co-op has the best gay-inclusive advertising

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ABSOLUT COMES A CLOSE SECOND IN STONEWALL’S SOCIAL MEDIA POLL

The Co-operative has been voted the best company in Britain for lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) inclusive advertising and marketing.

The poll – which ran on Stonewall’s Facebook and Twitter pages and received almost 700 votes – ranked companies in the following order for their LGB inclusive advertising and marketing:

1. The Co-operative (31%)
2. Absolut (25.6%)
3. IKEA (20.4%)
4. Lloyds TSB (14.2%)
5. Pepsi (4.9%)
6. Thomson (3.9%)

Examples of each company’s LGB-inclusive advertising campaigns can be found here: www.stonewall.org.uk/evidence

The Co-operative Group’s Marketing Director Gill Barr said: ‘We’re delighted to win this poll which underlines the Co-operative’s position as a leader in the field of marketing to the LGB community. The Co-operative works closely with Stonewall and is the only retailer in their Top 100 employers index. We have a dedicated diversity team within the business – we sponsor numerous Pride events nationwide. The business is firmly committed to serving the LGB consumer base.’

The Co-operative has run a series of campaigns aimed specifically at LGB consumers. In 2005 The Co-operative Funeralcare partnered with Pink Partings to offer LGB people judgement-free support when they need it most. In 2009 and 2010, The Co-operative sponsored Manchester Pride and promoted this through a radio advertising campaign.

Absolut released a rainbow design bottle to mark the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall riots alongside its ‘NO LABEL’ bottle, designed to challenge prejudice.

Stonewall Deputy Chief Executive Laura Doughty said: ‘The British pink pound is worth approximately £81million. Gay and ethical consumers are now a significant market. Stonewall’s Marketing Guide gives businesses advice on how to market to LGB consumers. Companies should follow the Co-operative’s good example – especially when they think about all those gay consumers who may shun their local Asda or Morrisons for their weekly shop – preferring to use the Co-op instead.’